Ŭ

Basic Latin alphabet
Aa Bb Cc Dd    
Ee Ff Gg Hh
Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn
Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt
Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz

U (; u, plural ues)[1][2] is the twenty-first letter and a vowel in the basic modern Latin alphabet.

Contents


History

The letter U ultimately comes from the Semitic letter Waw by way of the letter Y. See the letter Y for details.

During the late Middle Ages, two forms of "v" developed, which were both used for its ancestor u and modern v. The pointed form "v" was written at the beginning of a word, while a rounded form "u" was used in the middle or end, regardless of sound. So whereas valor and excuse appeared as in modern printing, "have" and "upon" were printed haue and vpon. The first distinction between the letters "u" and "v" is recorded in a Gothic alphabet from 1386, where "v" preceded "u". By the mid-16th century, the "v" form was used to represent the consonant and "u" the vowel sound, giving us the modern letter "u". Capital "U" was not accepted as a distinct letter until many years later.[3]

Usage

U is commonly associated with the close back rounded vowel [u] found in many languages. This form is colloquially termed the "long u" in English.

In English there is also a "short U", which in most dialects of English is an open-mid back unrounded vowel [ʌ].

U is used to mark enzyme unit .

Codes for computing

Alternative representations of U

In Unicode the capital U is codepoint U+0055 and the lowercase u is U+0075.

The ASCII code for capital U is 85 and for lowercase u is 117; or in binary 01010101 and 01110101, correspondingly.

The EBCDIC code for capital U is 228 and for lowercase u is 164.

The numeric character references in HTML and XML are "U" and "u" for upper and lower case respectively.

See also

References

  1. "U" Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993)
  2. Brown & Kiddle (1870) The institutes of English grammar, p 19.
    Ues is the plural of the name of the letter; the plural of the letter itself is U's, Us, u's, or us.
  3. Pflughaupt, Laurent (2008). . trans. Gregory Bruhn. Princeton Architectural Press. pp. 123–124. . http://books.google.com/books?id=63Qnbt2CMiMC&pg=PA124. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
The ISO basic Latin alphabetThis box: [[|view]]·[[|talk]]·edit
Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
Letter U with diacritics
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Two-letter combinations
Ua Ub Uc Ud Ue Uf Ug Uh Ui Uj Uk Ul Um Un Uo Up Uq Ur Us Ut Uu Uv Uw Ux Uy Uz
UA UB UC UD UE UF UG UH UI UJ UK UL UM UN UO UP UQ UR US UT UU UV UW UX UY UZ
AU BU CU DU EU FU GU HU IU JU KU LU MU NU OU PU QU RU SU TU UU VU WU XU YU ZU
Au Bu Cu Du Eu Fu Gu Hu Iu Ju Ku Lu Mu Nu Ou Pu Qu Ru Su Tu Uu Vu Wu Xu Yu Zu
Letter-digit and digit-letter combinations
    U0 U1 U2 U3 U4 U5 U6 U7 U8 U9     0U 1U 2U 3U 4U 5U 6U 7U 8U 9U    

history palaeography derivations diacritics punctuation numerals Unicode list of letters ISO/IEC 646 |}